Redistricting

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Every ten years following the census, officials are required to redraw our legislative and congressional boundaries to make sure each district has roughly the same amount of people in it so one district doesn’t have more influence than the others. Idahoans need to get involved in Idaho’s redistricting process to deliver fairly drawn political maps so we the people make decisions about who we call to help govern.

History

In 1994, the Idaho legislature established the Independent Redistricting Commission, which is charged with drawing our political boundaries every ten years. The commission is made up of three members of the majority party and three members from the minority party. Any boundary created must be approved by a majority of the commission, requiring bipartisan agreement. The commission’s decisions must be in accordance with rules that prevent them from giving their party or incumbents an undue advantage. These rules ensure the redistricting process isn’t controlled by gerrymandering. It is a system that has worked for decades, reduced the number of costly lawsuits, and is considered a model for other states to follow.

What’s At Stake

Idaho’s new political maps will be used for the next 10 years and beyond, so it’s critical that our redistricting commissioners hear from us. It’s important for Idahoans who value free and fair elections to get involved in the process. When we draw the maps, our communities are represented by leaders who know us and who represent our needs.

We need to ensure fair maps are drawn so that every Idahoan has the right to equal representation, whether you’re from rural or urban Idaho.

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Public Hearings

Idaho’s Redistricting Commission will be holding a series of public meetings across the state. Sign up for updates to be notified when a public meeting will be held near you and for other opportunities to weigh in.

Public Hearing Dates

How to Comment at Public Hearings

In the redistricting process, Idaho requires the consideration of communities of interest (COIs). Though currently undefined under state law, a community of interest is typically a population that shares cultural, historical, or economic interests. Communities do not necessarily share the same political viewpoints or support for certain candidates or political parties. At the public hearings, you can add your community to contribute your voice to the redistricting process.

Here’s a document you can use to think through what your community of interest is and how best to make public comment:

Community of Interest